Joan Dye Gussow: Women, Food and the Survival of the Species

While I slog away at the Generation Food project, here’s more from the occasional series of pamphlets and books from the history of the food movement – a 1988 lecture by the excellent Joan Dye Gussow: Women, Food, and the Survival of the Species. With thanks, as ever, to DBS, and to Joan.

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Thoughts on Land Reform Summits in San Francisco

In San Francisco, from April 25-28, 400 people from across the country and around the world gathered to discuss an awkward problem – land reform in America. Land reform is a loaded term, one that reeled conference participants’ imaginations toward the antics of Third World dictators and communist zealots. It’s hard to conceive a more un-American activity than thinking about an alternative to private property. Yet here were the Friends of the Earth next to the NAACP west coast region, alongside the Archdiocese of Kansas doing exactly that.

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Haiti: Horsemen and hoarse women

It’s already bitterly ironic that Bill Clinton is the United Nation’s special envoy to Haiti, after the economic policy he imposed there to transform it into the Caribbean’s sweatshop. Now, President Obama has asked George Bush to lead fundraising efforts for relief in Haiti. After Bush took part in an international coup to overthrow Aristide. It’s like sending in the horsemen of the apocalypse to negotiate peace.

There are, however, more sensible ideas. Here’s some analysis curated by Dan Moshenberg that reinstates that most hidden perspective in disaster – gender. More below the fold. Continue reading “Haiti: Horsemen and hoarse women”

Rich vs Poor, with Chinese Characteristics

It’s hard to get reliable information on what’s happening in China, so this post comes with a bit of a disclaimer. I’m not sufficiently familiar with the source, ChinaWorker.info, to vouch for it. A figure of 96% aggrieved about inequality seems high, but then again the New York Times cites it too. And I am familiar with some of the data: the number of ‘mass incidents’ in China last year sounds about right – a quarter of a million protests. It seems like China’s well on its way to A Million Mutinies Now.

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The Value of Nothing in the US

The Value of Nothing, US Cover

I’m on tour in the US! Truth be told, I’ve been on tour for a week, appeared on National Public Radio, and West Coast Live (like Prairie Home Companion, but funnier and with fewer banjos), and have cropped up at a the Commonwealth Club, and a bookstore or two in the San Francisco Bay Area. But now I’m on the road, hitting Boston, New York, Washington DC, Portland, Seattle, Los Angeles with the book in hand. Continue reading “The Value of Nothing in the US”

Ashes to Ashes

I cover the carbon trading disaster in The Value of Nothing, and every day brings more evidence that it’s an idea riddled with holes. Europol, the European Police Office, has recently uncovered over EUR 5 billion (over US$ 7 billion) in carbon fraud in the past 18 months alone. (They also provide a handy diagram explaining how the fraud works.) The problems aren’t exclusively European, though. The excellent Outlook India reports on the fiasco in the world’s second largest country. More below the fold.
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