Chicken, for Christ’s sake

Below, an adaptation of part of A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things, written with Jason W Moore, published in The Guardian. If you’ve read the book, do look out for the post-publication addendum of the story of Oklahoma-based Christian Alcoholics and Addicts in Recovery. CAAIR was set up by chicken executives so that survivors of the opioid epidemic might pray by day and work on the understaffed night-shift at slaughterhouses. Do read the full story, as researched by the Center for Investigative Reporting. And, meantime, here’s the excerpt as published in the Long Reads series at the Guardian.

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Developing the Syllabus for an Agroecology Course

Bob St Peter, activist and farmer in northern Maine, is working on developing a syllabus for an agroecology course.  Miguel Altieri sends these two sources to help. What else can Bob look at to develop his own curriculum? Please share your ideas in the comments and if you want to join the school, more details are below, and you can contact Bob  at Agroecologymaine@gmail.com

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Ask Not What Refugees Can Do For Us…

Co-written with Eric Tang, and published by Reuters on World Refugee Day, 2016. 

Today is World Refugee Day, the most contentious one in recent memory. Refugee resettlement once enjoyed bipartisan support in the United States, but in the wake of terrorist attacks in Paris and Orlando there are few issues more polarizing in this election year. At the center of the storm are Syrian refugees fleeing persecution, many of them making the deadly passage across the Mediterranean. Fear-mongering conservatives demand that all Syrians be kept out of the United States. Liberals call for granting entry to a select few, albeit under strict guidelines.

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Ida B Wells, Science Fiction Writer

Ida B Wells deserves her place in the canon of journalism and social change. In the science fiction, not so much. I found her “A Story of 1900”, written in 1886, while digging for other things. It may not be a classic, but not only was it written two years before Edward Bellamy’s epochal Looking Backward, but the story lives and breathes Octavia Butler’s thoughts on the use of science fiction for black people.

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