FYI: Status of Female Farmers Rises During Food Crisis

Status of Female Farmers Rises During Food Crisis
By: Rebecca Harshbarger
WeNews correspondent
Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Women produce between 60 and 80 percent of the food in poorer countries. Sex-specific data aggregation and the integration of female farmers’ produce into school programs are recent innovations boosting the status of rural women.

(WOMENSENEWS)–The women who grow more than half the world’s agricultural produce have gained international recognition and aid since the start of the global food crisis in 2007.

Instead of being seen as a minor, vulnerable group, international aid agencies have begun keeping sex-specific data and reaching out to them as development partners, said Jeannette Gurung, director of the Washington-based Women Organizing for Change in Agriculture and National Resource Management

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2 Replies to “FYI: Status of Female Farmers Rises During Food Crisis”

  1. Once again, the Feminists twist reality, and define exploitation of women as independence.

    “Instead of being seen as a minor, vulnerable group, international aid agencies have begun keeping sex-specific data and reaching out to them as development partners … “.

    “Developing partners”. Is this what the women/children are feeling? What about husbands?
    These women are vulnerable, because the article later indicates the men have left the area.
    ” Across the continent, high rates of male migration to cities from the countryside has created an even larger role for women in farming.” — end of quote.
    What is posed as being good, in reality, bad. Lack of men to provide, women forced to work.
    The women may be grateful for this opportunity, considering these problems they’re up against.

  2. The young man with the moniker ‘buddha boy’ has proven the human vehicle can be sustained on prana or perhaps some kind of etheric energy by not eating or drinking for a number of years. Perhaps this this lifestyle would solve the world’s hunger and food distribution problems?

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